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    • #42786
      James Young
      Participant

      Ours does the same. I am not sure what fridge you have but we have a ‘lock’ rotating disc on the top. It works to a degree.

      One thing I did notice was that the door is held in place by metal hinge pins in the fridge frame top and bottom. These pins go into the plastic door frame, a raised plastic discs molded into that plastic frame holds the door up slightly, leaving a gap at the bottom for the door to open.

      This plastic bit molded into the door cracks around the edge, probably under the weight of the door. This plastic bit then bends inside the door frame, the door drops a few millimetres and now the top door catch no longer catches.

      I need to fix mine, replacing the plastic disc with a metal strip with a hole drilled in it, screwed to the bottom edge of the fridge door. Should be stronger and be able to take the weight of the door.

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #32698
      James Young
      Participant

      Another peculiar interaction with the forum. When I read your post above jefe4x4 I did not see a photo nore any link to a photo.

      The image code has not been enter properly. The forum recognises it as code because it has a < starter. But, it does not display it as text. When you ‘Quote’ you see the code as it shows the whole post, inlcuding any code.

      To insert an image. Have your image URL ready. Then use the button at the top of the field where you are writing the post. This will ask you for the URL and then enter the code correctly for you. Image is below.

      Take a last look. My venerable Lance Lite 165-s is on the block for $3200. Many upgrades later it’s time for a new camper.
      Truck

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #32697
      James Young
      Participant

      I have had both.

      The Roadmaster was on a half ton truck and was used for towing a trailer. It was an absolutely excellent choice and when I had not trailer attached the Roadmaster still improved handling. As you know, the more pressure on the Roadmaster the more it works, less pressure, less work. Easy to install too.

      I use the Big Wig on my Ram 3500. The BigWig is not bad off road to be honest. I have taken it through some fairly gnarly stuff in Utah with a loaded truck and camper. Strangely, the main issue I have with it is when going over bumps like a speed bump off centre, the swaybar holds the truck in place so it rocks quite a lot. I never notice that issue off road however.

      The Roadmaster does what it says on the tin. Handling improved loaded and unloaded. It did reduce some roll but will not reduce as much roll as the Hellwig. The Hellwig will not make much difference to the straight-up ride like the Roadmaster does though.

      The Roadmaster is effectively extra leaf springs. Less when you don’t need it, more when you do. I am full time in my camper and do a fair bit of off-road so I went to Deaver Springs and had my leaf packs rebuilt to suit the full-time camper weight.

      I am considering removing my rear swaybar to see what happens. (I had removed my front once for mechanical issues and that was awful!). If I don’t notice too much extra sway I may just leave it off for a better ride on the bumpy stuff.

      Not sure if that helps you.

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #25440
      James Young
      Participant

      I have an XPCamper, which has a tented section around the bed running along the front side and down each end of the bed.

      There are two ‘tubes’ of material along each side of the tent. One tube higher up, one tube lower. In each tube is a single bungee. The bungee runs along each side of the tent and along the back. This forms a U shape.

      At each end of the bungee is a hook. Grabbing hold of each hook at either end of the U shape, I stretch the bungee and then hook the hooks together. This completes the bungee ‘loop’ and means I now have an O shape bungee (or square anyway) around the tented area that is trying to pull itself into the centre.

      I repeat that for the other bungee. Now I have two loops of bungee pulling into the centre. One higher than the other.

      As I lower the roof the tented areas goes slack, the taught bungee ‘O’ shape pulls into the centre taking up the slack and folds the tent in on itself.

      The tubes of material hide the bungee, so you only ever see the plastic hooks at each end until you pull them taught and clip them together.

      That was a bit harder to describe than I thought!

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #23291
      James Young
      Participant

      Unless you are going to forgo AC, microwave, and any other heavy draw 120-volt appliances

      Yes 🙂

      Does a microwave actually use that much? 1500w would be 125ah inverted from 12v (?)…. if you reheat something for 2 minutes that’s only around 4 amps used. A high power device but short usage. AC on the other hand …

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #23290
      James Young
      Participant

      I don’t understand- if you’re willing to have a 12,000lb winch, why not a 15,000 or 16,000 lb winch?

      Agreed. Other than maybe a little weight and a few extra bucks it’s better to go all in.

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #23289
      James Young
      Participant

      Not interested in a generator if I can avoid it. I notice that some class Bs are sold with “underhood generators” AKA a second alternator. Some pickups are sold with “heavy duty alternators”. Equivalent? Bad idea? Find it odd that I don’t see it mentioned in truck camper discussions.

      I am not an auto electrician by any means but from what I understand, with my solar at least, the AGM batteries do not simply take on board whatever is thrown at them.

      There is an initial BULK charge, a ton of solar or charge from your truck alternator for example satisfies this quite well. This accounts for 80% of the battery capacity. After this initial bulk charge the batteries want less, the controller reduces the charge accordingly and it enters an ABSORBTION stage. At this point even if you have a truck running and a ton of solar the batteries do not use it, they just want a smaller amount. This accounts for just under the final 20% of battery capacity. After that you end up with batteries requiring even less. A FLOAT charge that takes ages and take the batteries up to around 100%. Then there is a final stage that you will rarely get to unless plugged in, so we plug in to shore power every 6 or 8 weeks to get that final bit overnight that keeps the batteries in good condition.

      So … having a heavy alternator will help if your truck doesn’t provide much bulk charge at the start. But after that, the benefit tails off significantly. That bulk charge accepts a lot of juice quickly. This means that you don’t actually need much solar to continue those later stages of charge. If you had full solar amps you wouldn’t be using it.

      If we have a drive in the morning and ok solar during the day then we are back up to 100% (but not ‘full charge’) by the evening.

      A basic explanation from a relative novice. Happy to be corrected by someone.

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #23218
      James Young
      Participant

      Firestone now do a ‘Ride Rite Red Label’ airbag. Basically, their existing excellent Ride Rite beefed up with better materials that are 50% stronger but the same size. According to Firestone the Red Label are no different in ride quality at all, just using better materials.

      The existing Ride Rite are rated up to 100psi. The Red Label boost that to 150psi. A difference you may not actually use but the 50% durability increase is across the board both in the rubber used and the rest of the structure/bracket (according to the techs as Firestone I spoke to, anyway)

      With airbags being a somewhat weak link due to the rubber durability I went with the Red Label for an extra $100.

      As someone mentioned, you may get a ‘boaty’ feel with too much reliance on the airbags. We had the leafs rebuilt by Deaver in Santa Ana to match the camper. I think that was $400 and a great investment but would not ride that well if we took the camper off (which we do not).

      The BigWig sway bar works great. Just be aware of any lift you have. once you hit 2″-2.5″ like me you’ll be in between the standard and extended link end lengths (as we are) I have tried cutting the extended ends down but have not installed yet. Your truck may work out differently.

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #23211
      James Young
      Participant

      Young, you nailed it. Pre DEF Cummins 3500 4WD XP camper. That location looks familiar. Where was it taken.
      jefe
      p.s. I tried to put an image up on this post and an error message came up saying my file was too large. I don’t think I have any pix that are as tiny as 512KB’s in size.

      Hey Jefe.

      Thanks. Image was taken up Fish Creek in Anza Borrego (not that far up).

      To reduce an image size you can try simpleimageresizer .com Simply upload the image, select the ‘Dimensions’ option. Around 1000 pixels wide should be ample for a message board. Hope that helps.

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #23204
      James Young
      Participant

      I will not be driving through 2′ of mud or climbing over rocks like some off road enthusiasts take on just because the have a winch to pull them out.

      I concur with Mike. If we remove the winching other things out of the equation (tress etc), and you are looking solely at stuck vehicle recovery, then you don’t actually need to be doing anything too sketchy to get right up there in terms of how much winch power you need.

      Most are surprised with winch requirements in relation to how stuck you are.

      Mired up to the tires can require a winch pull of total vehicle weight. Mired to the wheels can be 2 x vehicle weight, mired to the body 3 x vehicle weight.

      Then you have to add in any grade. A 15% grade would add an extra 25% weight for example.

      A 12,000lb camper mired tire deep is going to need a maxed out 12,000 winch (using a full line – each spool loses around 10% winch capacity I think) to pull it out. Any worse than that will require a solid anchor point with a snatch block back to the vehicle.

      If you can convince yourself that situation is the worst you will come across, and you have a 12,000lb camper, then a 12,000 winch, winch extension and a snatch block might suffice. A snatch block giving you half the line but a 2x mechanical advantage.

      I think a 10,000lb and up full-size truck and camper warrants the biggest light truck / off road winch, something like the Warn 16.5

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #23197
      James Young
      Participant

      Humidity or condensation? For condensation, sometimes it’s the dreaded balance of vent/window opening amount and how much cold you are letting in. Bigger duvet, more vent opening! I have found that ‘cracking’ windows or a vent is not enough to reduce condensation. I fear you may be in a losing battle trying to reduce humidity from the levels outside.

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

    • #23195
      James Young
      Participant

      2007 Dodge Ram 3500
      2018 XPCamper V1E

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

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    • #23186
      James Young
      Participant

      I have an XP with 3 x 180w solar panels and 600 amp hours of battery life at 12v made up of 2x [2 x 300ah 6v].

      We currently get way more solar than we need but when we were in a less sunny situation we used to get down to around 85% of our available power storage overnight, re-charging during the day but reducing an extra 5% each day we stayed in one place and were not receiving power from the truck s0, 85, 80, 75, 70% etc overnight.

      We use a diesel cooktop – which still uses some electricity for the fan etc, and also diesel heating / hot water, which still uses electricity to move the air around. Both are Webasto.

      We considered an induction cooktop but it would have been the only appliance that required more than a 1000w inverter, so we didn’t bother with the upgrade. The induction cooktops take a lot of juice but they do have the benefit of cooking extremely quickly, offsetting the power use. If you are a heat up and eat kind of cook then great. If you are a simmer kind of cook then not only does the induction use a chunk of power but it is also on or off; it pulses. So no simmer, just boil / off / boil / off .. repeat. Other XP owners have induction and like it though.

      I think, in answer to your question, an all electric rig would be fine providing you had a decent battery pack / solar and had a decent bit of time on the road every other day to do the initial battery bulk charge, letting the solar top off the rest. Whether it would work would depend on drive time / solar ability in relation to your power useage.

      On a side note, we plug in every month or so just to actually get the batteries to full charge. The charging cycle means that even driving daily and full sun solar, will not get you to a true full charge, which takes hours of continual small current.

      2007 Dodge 3500
      [5.9 Cummins, Stick Shift] + [XPCamper V1E]

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