Home Forums Truck Camper Adventure Forum Gas or Diesel

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    • #38058
      Freespool
      Participant

      I just wanted to make a simple comment based upon my experience. Bottom line, IMO, if you don’t need the big torque and horse power of a late model diesel engine, don’t buy one. Don’t get me wrong, I love mine and I also need it. The Allison behind it is a huge bonus, but it was not standard and I seem to remember the diesel option was around 15-20 grand.

      Gas engines in newer trucks have come a long way. There torque curve compared to a diesel is a joke, but combined with there high horse power ratings they can easily get the medium size job done. There weight is a huge bonus for TC’ers and there cost is way less to buy. Fuel cost is less and they may need fewer trips to the smog station. My 4 year diesel with 17K is due for it’s second smog check, my 5 and 6 year old gas engines have not even made there first visit.

      I could go on all night, but I won’t. The reason I made this post was to demonstrate the responsibility needed these days in order to own a diesel. I spoke to one of my drivers in Santa Maria this week and he explained why he was driving a late model gas Chevrolet. One fill up with poor quality diesel in his late model Dodge nearly ruined the truck. The insurance paid the 24 grand the dealer charged to rebuild his entire fuel system. He quickly came to the conclusion that he no longer could afford to drive a diesel truck. Obtaining quality fuel is mandatory when driving a diesel. Finding good clean fuel that is not loaded up with garbage is becoming a crap shoot. Fuel is not the only issue either, quality deft is also needed. I remember getting fuel and deft in my company issue’d semi at the yard I drove to this week. The very next day the truck was at the repair center for over a month and I was stuck with a piece of crap rental. Bottom line, choose the power train of your next truck very carefully. For most of you, gas is a better option. For those of us who pull trailers with 6 or 8 horses or 5er’s that weigh over 17K there is only one choice, but most truck owners do not fall into category.

    • #38082
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Agreed, My understanding is that Ford developed this gasser engine mainly in response to Commercial user’s concerns about costly diesel maintenance, nagging breakdowns and costly diesel emission repairs…Considering the weight savings of the power plant, I’m most curious about the gasser’s ability to haul a heavy Arse camper – mine fully watered (66 gal) and loaded with DW’s hair dryer is nearing 5,000 lbs…

      Phil

    • #38178
      Jefe4x4
      Moderator

      We’ve lately been tossing around the option of buying a new Ford 7.3, 4WD, gas, SRW, 10 speed auto, F-350. They promote it as a real V-8 TRUCK engine, not a warmed over passenger car engine. As it’s a new offering, it’s difficult to find any user reports on mpg, and power with a load, but the load carrying ability, at least on paper is way up there. If any of you have a link, lehmee noh.
      There is nothing wrong with our Generation II Dodge Cummins H.O. except we’re getting old enough for Jeanie not to want to drive the 6-speed manual anymore; at least not with the zeal that she drove her 1961 VW convertible, or our 1980 International Harvester Scout Diesel Traveler some decades ago.
      jefe

      2020 Ford F-350 XLT FX4 4WD SRW SB SC 7.3L Godzilla Gas TorqShift 10R140 397 amps dual Alt dual batts Frnt Dana 60; Rr Dana M275 E-locker 4.30's 4580/4320/4066# payload 7243# curb wt. 11,300# GVWR 5-er prepped. 2020 Northstar Laredo SC, 12v compressor fridge, cassette, 320w Solar sub zero insulation.

    • #39064
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I think Fast Lane Trucks has YouTube reviews of the 7.3. I love the new engine. Love the new co developed 10sp tranny too. However, if I had to buy a truck today I’d probably get the Ford 6.2, simply because its a reliable well worked out engine. I’d wait a year or two for the 7.3.

      Now as for diesels versus gas trucks … I’d never buy another diesel. Traded mine in on a 5L F150. Love the truck but hate that I hit its limits (payload mostly) so easily. It truly shines on Colorado mtn roads, allowing me to reach remote fishing spots.

      I put myself through college working in a garage and so I did all the maintenance on my 6.4 powerstroke. My 100k mile service cost me almost $1800 in parts. The lion share was the radiator I had to replace. The plastic side tanks were vulnerable. I swore I’d never buy another emission diesel. I use to keep extra EGT sensors and a wrench in the glove box in case one failed on a trip. In my opinion diesels are great to drive on a trip but horrible to own. Imagine a $8500 diesel option and spending that much just to change out the fuel pump. Crazy crazy crazy expensive parts.

      I like bottom lines ….

      For me the bottom line is that if you have a business that requires heavy work then a diesel might be the solution. I say might. None of the contractors (roofing, lawn, etc) drive diesels in my area any longer.

      Cost of ownership. Crazy expensive repair costs. I changed a radiator hose on my wife’s Ford Edge for about $20. I put 3 new hoses on my powerstroke at a cost of about $130 each. No thanks.

      I am torn. I love my 2016 4×4 5L F150. I am smitten! 21mpg highway is no problem when the traffic is light and its a strong simple package. Lately though, I’ve been thinking of moving to a 3/4 ton for additional payload … allows me to load up a hardside truck camper. If this was year 2 of the 7.3 production there would be no question … I’d buy the 7.3 gas engine. Diesel would not even cross my mind.

      Diesels

    • #39065
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I just wanted to make a simple comment based upon my experience. Bottom line, IMO, if you don’t need the big torque and horse power of a late model diesel engine, don’t buy one. Don’t get me wrong, I love mine and I also need it. The Allison behind it is a huge bonus, but it was not standard and I seem to remember the diesel option was around 15-20 grand.

      Gas engines in newer trucks have come a long way. There torque curve compared to a diesel is a joke, but combined with there high horse power ratings they can easily get the medium size job done. There weight is a huge bonus for TC’ers and there cost is way less to buy. Fuel cost is less and they may need fewer trips to the smog station. My 4 year diesel with 17K is due for it’s second smog check, my 5 and 6 year old gas engines have not even made there first visit.

      I could go on all night, but I won’t. The reason I made this post was to demonstrate the responsibility needed these days in order to own a diesel. I spoke to one of my drivers in Santa Maria this week and he explained why he was driving a late model gas Chevrolet. One fill up with poor quality diesel in his late model Dodge nearly ruined the truck. The insurance paid the 24 grand the dealer charged to rebuild his entire fuel system. He quickly came to the conclusion that he no longer could afford to drive a diesel truck. Obtaining quality fuel is mandatory when driving a diesel. Finding good clean fuel that is not loaded up with garbage is becoming a crap shoot. Fuel is not the only issue either, quality deft is also needed. I remember getting fuel and deft in my company issue’d semi at the yard I drove to this week. The very next day the truck was at the repair center for over a month and I was stuck with a piece of crap rental. Bottom line, choose the power train of your next truck very carefully. For most of you, gas is a better option. For those of us who pull trailers with 6 or 8 horses or 5er’s that weigh over 17K there is only one choice, but most truck owners do not fall into category.

      My experience too. Many are also discovering that their extended warranty let them down. Push back on failed DEF tanks, plugged particulate filters, failed fuel pumps, leaky bed planes, failed EGR coolers, leaky radiators and towing bills due to failed EGT sensors. Gosh … not for me. I totally agree with you … If you have a need for heavy work a diesel might be the truck for you but go into it with your eyes open. I agree that lots might better be off driving gas. And you can get pretty long life out of a gas powertrain by doing really great maintenance. I don’t mean just following the owners manual. I thought my powerstroke would last me 300k miles and I got rid of it at 100k.

      Today … I’d buy a 6.2L Ford … its just been around and works well
      Tomorrow … I’d buy a 7.3L Ford … fantastic but I don’t like buying 1st year

    • #39067
      Dumb Mick
      Participant

      Solid reasoning given your parameters. I’m highly leery of new diesels but I’m afraid I’ve painted myself into a corner. I’m planning on putting a Host Mammoth on a F550 chassis cab with a Sherptek bed and a Buckstop single wheel conversion (4.8 rear end turning 41” tires). No way will that 7.3 gasser haul that rig up some Colorado grade!

      It’s good to be a n00b - so I can aspire to be just stoopid.

      Monrovia, CA

    • #43413
      Sean Silvera
      Participant

      Going back to gas! My last four rigs have been Diesel. The last really good one was a 06 or 07 Silverado without DEF. That thing was a tractor!! Power Power Power!! It burned up in a Fire and i bought a 2011 Silverado that I just didnt have luck with it. Emission codes on long drives and into limp mode was a common ocurance so I sold it. The last was a Ram Cummins and it was pretty awesome but going anywhere south of the boarder was a NO GO because of lack of quality ULSD and DEF.

      Picking up my New Ram in a week and going with a Gas Hemi!

      I rarely tow but do carry a couple thousand lbs in the bed!

    • #51575
      Met
      Member

      I have a diesel engine and at the moment I’m interested in yanmar diesel engine parts. I need to find parts by number. Does anyone know how to do this?

    • #51577
      beanstelk
      Participant

      This question is very relevant today. It seems to me that from the economic point of view, diesel engines are much more economical both in maintenance and in operation. I work with technology and can compare which is better.

    • #51578
      beanstelk
      Participant

      This is my personal opinion

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